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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2012, Article ID 920953, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/920953
Review Article

Dopamine Oxidation and Autophagy

1Molecular & Clinical Pharmacology, ICBM, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Independencia 1027, Santiago 8380453, Chile
2Department of Basic Sciences, Santo Tomas University, Viña del Mar 2561780, Chile

Received 5 June 2012; Accepted 9 July 2012

Academic Editor: José Manuel Fuentes Rodríguez

Copyright © 2012 Patricia Muñoz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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