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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 985157, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/985157
Research Article

Magnolol Protects against MPTP/MPP+-Induced Toxicity via Inhibition of Oxidative Stress in In Vivo and In Vitro Models of Parkinson’s Disease

1Laboratory of Alternative Medicine and Experimental Therapeutics, Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokuriku University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1181, Japan
2Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Tokushima 770-8514, Japan

Received 5 January 2012; Accepted 20 February 2012

Academic Editor: Russell H. Swerdlow

Copyright © 2012 Akiko Muroyama et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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