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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2015, Article ID 124214, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/124214
Review Article

Action Observation and Motor Imagery: Innovative Cognitive Tools in the Rehabilitation of Parkinson’s Disease

1Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics and Maternal Child Health, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy
2Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Human Physiology, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy

Received 25 May 2015; Accepted 23 August 2015

Academic Editor: Serene S. Paul

Copyright © 2015 Giovanni Abbruzzese et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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