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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2015, Article ID 232958, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/232958
Clinical Study

Clinical Features Associated with Frozen Shoulder Syndrome in Parkinson’s Disease

1Department of Biological Science, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
2Department of Neurology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung 833, Taiwan
3Department of Emergency Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung 833, Taiwan
4Department of Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung 833, Taiwan
5Department of Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung 833, Taiwan
6Department of Neurology, Xiamen Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Xiamen, Fujian, China

Received 8 January 2015; Accepted 17 May 2015

Academic Editor: Jan O. Aasly

Copyright © 2015 Ya-Ting Chang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Frozen shoulder syndrome is a common musculoskeletal disease of idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD) that causes long-term pain and physical disability. A better understanding of the associated factors can help identify PD patients who will require prevention to improve their quality of life. Methodology. This prospective study evaluated 60 shoulders of 30 PD patients. Correlation analysis was used to evaluate the relationships between clinical factors and shoulder sonography findings. Results. Frozen shoulder syndrome was found in 14 of 30 PD patients affecting 19 shoulders, including bilateral involvement in five and unilateral involvement in nine. There was a significant positive correlation between the parameters of sonography findings and frozen shoulder syndrome (i.e., thickness of bicipital effusion and tendon thickness of the subscapularis and supraspinatus) and mean ipsilateral Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) III and its subscores (tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia scores). Conclusions. Higher ipsilateral UPDRS and subscores are associated with increased effusion around the biceps tendon, with increased tendon thickness of subscapularis and supraspinatus. Preventing frozen shoulder syndrome in the high-risk PD group is an important safety issue and highly relevant for their quality of life.