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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2015, Article ID 378032, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/378032
Research Article

MRI Correlates of Parkinson’s Disease Progression: A Voxel Based Morphometry Study

Department of Neuroscience, Nuovo Ospedale Civile S. Agostino-Estense, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Viale Giardini 1355, 41126 Modena, Italy

Received 23 September 2014; Revised 23 December 2014; Accepted 23 December 2014

Academic Editor: Heinz Reichmann

Copyright © 2015 Valentina Fioravanti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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