Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2015, Article ID 513452, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/513452
Research Article

Dopaminergic Modulation of Medial Prefrontal Cortex Deactivation in Parkinson Depression

1Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536, USA
2Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536, USA
3Department of Neurology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536, USA
4Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536, USA
5Veterans Administration Medical Center, Lexington, KY 40502, USA
6Department of Statistics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536, USA
7Department of Biostatistics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536, USA
8Department of Psychiatry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536, USA
9Department of Behavioral Science, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536, USA

Received 28 July 2015; Accepted 25 November 2015

Academic Editor: Marjan Jahanshahi

Copyright © 2015 Anders H. Andersen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. L. X. Blonder and J. T. Slevin, “Emotional dysfunction in Parkinson's disease,” Behavioural Neurology, vol. 24, no. 3, pp. 201–217, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. L. X. Blonder, J. T. Slevin, R. J. Kryscio et al., “Dopaminergic modulation of memory and affective processing in Parkinson depression,” Psychiatry Research, vol. 210, no. 1, pp. 146–149, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. H. S. Mayberg, S. E. Starkstein, C. E. Peyser, J. Brandt, R. F. Dannals, and S. E. Folstein, “Paralimbic frontal lobe hypometabolism in depression associated with Huntington's disease,” Neurology, vol. 42, no. 9, pp. 1791–1797, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. H. A. Ring, C. J. Bench, M. R. Trimble, D. J. Brooks, R. S. J. Frackowiak, and R. J. Dolan, “Depression in Parkinson's disease. A positron emission study,” British Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 165, pp. 333–339, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. M. J. Mentis, A. R. McIntosh, K. Perrine et al., “Relationships among the metabolic patterns that correlate with mnemonic, visuospatial, and mood symptoms in Parkinson's disease,” The American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 159, no. 5, pp. 746–754, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. P. Remy, M. Doder, A. Lees, N. Turjanski, and D. Brooks, “Depression in Parkinson's disease: loss of dopamine and noradrenaline innervation in the limbic system,” Brain, vol. 128, no. 6, pp. 1314–1322, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. E. F. Cardoso, F. M. Maia, F. Fregni et al., “Depression in Parkinson's disease: convergence from voxel-based morphometry and functional magnetic resonance imaging in the limbic thalamus,” NeuroImage, vol. 47, no. 2, pp. 467–472, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. V. S. Mattay, A. Tessitore, J. H. Callicott et al., “Dopaminergic modulation of cortical function in patients with Parkinson's disease,” Annals of Neurology, vol. 51, no. 2, pp. 156–164, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. M. Argyelan, M. Carbon, M.-F. Ghilardi et al., “Dopaminergic suppression of brain deactivation responses during sequence learning,” Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 28, no. 42, pp. 10687–10695, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. R. Cools, E. Stefanova, R. A. Barker, T. W. Robbins, and A. M. Owen, “Dopaminergic modulation of high-level cognition in Parkinson's disease: the role of the prefrontal cortex revealed by PET,” Brain, vol. 125, no. 3, pp. 584–594, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. A. Tessitore, A. R. Hariri, F. Fera et al., “Dopamine modulates the response of the human amygdala: a study in Parkinson's disease,” The Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 22, no. 20, pp. 9099–9103, 2002. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. J. A. Yesavage, T. L. Brink, T. L. Rose et al., “Development and validation of a geriatric depression screening scale: a preliminary report,” Journal of Psychiatric Research, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 37–49, 1982. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. L. X. Blonder, R. E. Gur, and R. C. Gur, “The effects of right and left hemiparkinsonism on prosody,” Brain and Language, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 193–207, 1989. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. S. Scott, F. I. Caird, and B. O. Williams, “Evidence for an apparent sensory speech disorder in Parkinson's disease,” Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, vol. 47, no. 8, pp. 840–843, 1984. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. D. H. Jacobs, J. Shuren, D. Bowers, and K. M. Heilman, “Emotional facial imagery, perception, and expression in Parkinson's disease,” Neurology, vol. 45, no. 9, pp. 1696–1702, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. R. Adolphs, R. Schul, and D. Tranel, “Intact recognition of facial emotion in Parkinson's disease,” Neuropsychology, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 253–258, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. S. M. Persad and J. Polivy, “Differences between depressed and nondepressed individuals in the recognition of and response to facial emotional cues,” Journal of Abnormal Psychology, vol. 102, no. 3, pp. 358–368, 1993. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. C. Naranjo, C. Kornreich, S. Campanella et al., “Major depression is associated with impaired processing of emotion in music as well as in facial and vocal stimuli,” Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 128, no. 3, pp. 243–251, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. A. M. Shannon, Differences between depressives and schizophrenics in the recognintion of facial expression of emotion [Doctoral Dissertation], University of California, San Francisco, Calif, USA, 1970.
  20. T. E. Feinberg, A. Rifkin, C. Schaffer, and E. Walker, “Facial discrimination and emotional recognition in schizophrenia and affective disorders,” Archives of General Psychiatry, vol. 43, no. 3, pp. 276–279, 1986. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. E. L. Cooley and S. Nowicki Jr., “Discrimination of facial expressions of emotions by depressed subjects,” Genetic, Social, and General Psychology Monographs, vol. 115, no. 4, pp. 451–465, 1989. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. M. L. Kesler-West, A. H. Andersen, C. D. Smith et al., “Neural substrates of facial emotion processing using fMRI,” Cognitive Brain Research, vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 213–226, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. A. J. Hughes, S. E. Daniel, L. Kilford, and A. J. Lees, “Accuracy of clinical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease: a clinico-pathological study of 100 cases,” Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, vol. 55, no. 3, pp. 181–184, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. J. L. Cummings, “Depression and parkinson's disease: a review,” American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 149, no. 4, pp. 443–454, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. J. Santamaria, E. Tolosa, and A. Valles, “Parkinson's disease with depression: a possible subgroup of idiopathic parkinsonism,” Neurology, vol. 36, no. 8, pp. 1130–1133, 1986. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. S. E. Starkstein, T. J. Preziosi, M. L. Berthier, P. L. Bolduc, H. S. Mayberg, and R. G. Robinson, “Depression and cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease,” Brain, vol. 112, no. 5, pp. 1141–1153, 1989. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. H. C. Breiter, N. L. Etcoff, P. J. Whalen et al., “Response and habituation of the human amygdala during visual processing of facial expression,” Neuron, vol. 17, no. 5, pp. 875–887, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. G. McCarthy, A. Puce, J. C. Gore, and T. Allison, “Face-specific processing in the human fusiform gyrus,” Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, vol. 9, no. 5, pp. 605–610, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. N. Kanwisher, J. McDermott, and M. M. Chun, “The fusiform face area: a module in human extrastriate cortex specialized for face perception,” Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 17, no. 11, pp. 4302–4311, 1997. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. M. L. Phillips, A. W. Young, S. K. Scott et al., “Neural responses to facial and vocal expressions of fear and disgust,” Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, vol. 83, pp. 1809–1817, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. R. Sprengelmeyer, A. W. Young, K. Mahn et al., “Facial expression recognition in people with medicated and unmedicated Parkinson's disease,” Neuropsychologia, vol. 41, no. 8, pp. 1047–1057, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  32. A. D. Lawrence, I. K. Goerendt, and D. J. Brooks, “Impaired recognition of facial expressions of anger in Parkinson's disease patients acutely withdrawn from dopamine replacement therapy,” Neuropsychologia, vol. 45, no. 1, pp. 65–74, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. P. Ekman and W. Friesen, Facial Action Coding System, Consulting Psychologists Press, Palo Alto, Calif, USA, 1978.
  34. R. C. Gur, R. Sara, M. Hagendoorn et al., “A method for obtaining 3-dimensional facial expressions and its standardization for use in neurocognitive studies,” Journal of Neuroscience Methods, vol. 115, no. 2, pp. 137–143, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. C. G. Kohler, T. H. Turner, W. B. Bilker et al., “Facial emotion recognition in schizophrenia: intensity effects and error pattern,” American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 160, no. 10, pp. 1768–1774, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. E. Matsumoto and P. Ekman, Japanese and Caucasian Facial Expressions of Emotion (JACFEE), Intercultural and Emotion Research Laboratory, Department of Psychology, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, Calif, USA, 1988.
  37. J. Talairach and P. Tournoux, Co-Planar Stereotaxic Atlas of the Human Brain, Thieme Medical Publishers, New York, NY, USA, 1988.
  38. N. Tzourio-Mazoyer, B. Landeau, D. Papathanassiou et al., “Automated anatomical labeling of activations in SPM using a macroscopic anatomical parcellation of the MNI MRI single-subject brain,” NeuroImage, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 273–289, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. M. L. Phillips, C. D. Ladouceur, and W. C. Drevets, “A neural model of voluntary and automatic emotion regulation: implications for understanding the pathophysiology and neurodevelopment of bipolar disorder,” Molecular Psychiatry, vol. 13, no. 9, pp. 833–857, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. M. M. Rive, G. van Rooijen, D. J. Veltman, M. L. Phillips, A. H. Schene, and H. G. Ruhé, “Neural correlates of dysfunctional emotion regulation in major depressive disorder. A systematic review of neuroimaging studies,” Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, vol. 37, no. 10, pp. 2529–2553, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. G. Northoff, A. Heinzel, F. Bermpohl et al., “Reciprocal modulation and attenuation in the prefrontal cortex: an fMRI study on emotional-cognitive interaction,” Human Brain Mapping, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 202–212, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. P.-O. Harvey, P. Fossati, J.-B. Pochon et al., “Cognitive control and brain resources in major depression: an fMRI study using the n-back task,” NeuroImage, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 860–869, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. R. L. Buckner, J. R. Andrews-Hanna, and D. L. Schacter, “The brain's default network: anatomy, function, and relevance to disease,” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 1124, pp. 1–38, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. Y. I. Sheline, D. M. Barch, J. L. Price et al., “The default mode network and self-referential processes in depression,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 106, no. 6, pp. 1942–1947, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  45. F. Biver, S. Goldman, V. Delvenne et al., “Frontal and parietal metabolic disturbances in unipolar depression,” Biological Psychiatry, vol. 36, no. 6, pp. 381–388, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. W. C. Drevets, “Prefrontal cortical-amygdalar metabolism in major depression,” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 877, pp. 614–637, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  47. C. Lemogne, P. Delaveau, M. Freton, S. Guionnet, and P. Fossati, “Medial prefrontal cortex and the self in major depression,” Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 136, no. 1-2, pp. e1–e11, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  48. M. D. Greicius, B. H. Flores, V. Menon et al., “Resting-state functional connectivity in major depression: abnormally increased contributions from subgenual cingulate cortex and thalamus,” Biological Psychiatry, vol. 62, no. 5, pp. 429–437, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  49. J. Posner, D. J. Hellerstein, I. Gat et al., “Antidepressants normalize the default mode network in patients with dysthymia,” JAMA Psychiatry, vol. 70, no. 4, pp. 373–382, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  50. S. G. Disner, C. G. Beevers, E. A. P. Haigh, and A. T. Beck, “Neural mechanisms of the cognitive model of depression,” Nature Reviews Neuroscience, vol. 12, no. 8, pp. 467–477, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  51. H. S. Mayberg, “Limbic-cortical dysregulation: a proposed model of depression,” Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 471–481, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  52. H. S. Mayberg, M. Liotti, S. K. Brannan et al., “Reciprocal limbic-cortical function and negative mood: converging PET findings in depression and normal sadness,” The American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 156, no. 5, pp. 675–682, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  53. H. S. Mayberg, S. K. Brannan, J. L. Tekell et al., “Regional metabolic effects of fluoxetine in major depression: serial changes and relationship to clinical response,” Biological Psychiatry, vol. 48, no. 8, pp. 830–843, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  54. H. S. Mayberg, “Modulating dysfunctional limbic-cortical circuits in depression: towards development of brain-based algorithms for diagnosis and optimised treatment,” British Medical Bulletin, vol. 65, pp. 193–207, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  55. H. S. Mayberg, A. M. Lozano, V. Voon et al., “Deep brain stimulation for treatment-resistant depression,” Neuron, vol. 45, no. 5, pp. 651–660, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  56. M. K. Johnson, S. Nolen-Hoeksema, K. J. Mitchell, and Y. Levin, “Medial cortex activity, self-reflection and depression,” Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, vol. 4, no. 4, pp. 313–327, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  57. G. Northoff, C. Wiebking, T. Feinberg, and J. Panksepp, “The 'resting-state hypothesis' of major depressive disorder-a translational subcortical-cortical framework for a system disorder,” Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, vol. 35, no. 9, pp. 1929–1945, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  58. S. Grimm, J. Ernst, P. Boesiger et al., “Increased self-focus in major depressive disorder is related to neural abnormalities in subcortical-cortical midline structures,” Human Brain Mapping, vol. 30, no. 8, pp. 2617–2627, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  59. T. van Eimeren, O. Monchi, B. Ballanger, and A. P. Strafella, “Dysfunction of the default mode network in Parkinson disease: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study,” Archives of Neurology, vol. 66, no. 7, pp. 877–883, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  60. P. Delaveau, P. Salgado-Pineda, P. Fossati, T. Witjas, J.-P. Azulay, and O. Blin, “Dopaminergic modulation of the default mode network in Parkinson's disease,” European Neuropsychopharmacology, vol. 20, no. 11, pp. 784–792, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  61. A.-M. Gotham, R. G. Brown, and C. D. Marsden, “Levodopa treatment may benefit or impair “frontal” function in Parkinson's disease,” The Lancet, vol. 328, no. 8513, pp. 970–971, 1986. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  62. R. Cools and M. D'Esposito, “Inverted-U-shaped dopamine actions on human working memory and cognitive control,” Biological Psychiatry, vol. 69, no. 12, pp. e113–e125, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  63. R. Cools, “Dopaminergic modulation of cognitive function-implications for L-DOPA treatment in Parkinson's disease,” Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 1–23, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  64. M. N. Smolka, G. Schumann, J. Wrase et al., “Catechol-O-methyltransferase val158met genotype affects processing of emotional stimuli in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex,” The Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 836–842, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  65. A. Heinz and M. N. Smolka, “The effects of catechol O-methyltransferase genotype on brain activation elicited by affective stimuli and cognitive tasks,” Reviews in the Neurosciences, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 359–367, 2006. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  66. K. Ohara, M. Nagai, Y. Suzuki, and K. Ohara, “Low activity allele of catechol-o-methyltransferase gene and Japanese unipolar depression,” NeuroReport, vol. 9, no. 7, pp. 1305–1308, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  67. E. Åberg, A. Fandiño-Losada, L. K. Sjöholm, Y. Forsell, and C. Lavebratt, “The functional Val158Met polymorphism in catechol-O- methyltransferase (COMT) is associated with depression and motivation in men from a Swedish population-based study,” Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 129, no. 1–3, pp. 158–166, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  68. H. Kunugi, S. Nanko, A. Ueki et al., “High and low activity alleles of catechol-O-methyltransferase gene: ethnic difference and possible association with Parkinson's disease,” Neuroscience Letters, vol. 221, no. 2-3, pp. 202–204, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  69. C.-H. Tai and R.-M. Wu, “Catechol-O-methyltransferase and Parkinson's disease,” Acta Medica Okayama, vol. 56, no. 1, pp. 1–6, 2002. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  70. M. Contin, P. Martinelli, M. Mochi, R. Riva, F. Albani, and A. Baruzzi, “Genetic polymorphism of catechol-O-methyltransferase and levodopa pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic pattern in patients with Parkinson's disease,” Movement Disorders, vol. 20, no. 6, pp. 734–739, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  71. C. Kiyohara, Y. Miyake, M. Koyanagi et al., “Genetic polymorphisms involved in dopaminergic neurotransmission and risk for Parkinson's disease in a Japanese population,” BMC Neurology, vol. 11, article 89, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  72. V. S. Mattay, T. E. Goldberg, F. Fera et al., “Catechol O-methyltransferase val158-met genotype and individual variation in the brain response to amphetamine,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 100, no. 10, pp. 6186–6191, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus