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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2015, Article ID 734746, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/734746
Review Article

The Role of α-Synuclein and LRRK2 in Tau Phosphorylation

Department of Regulation Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kitasato University, Sagamihara 2520373, Japan

Received 25 December 2014; Revised 2 April 2015; Accepted 2 April 2015

Academic Editor: E. K. Tan

Copyright © 2015 Fumitaka Kawakami and Takafumi Ichikawa. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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