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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2016, Article ID 5380202, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5380202
Review Article

Mini Review: Anticholinergic Activity as a Behavioral Pathology of Lewy Body Disease and Proposal of the Concept of “Anticholinergic Spectrum Disorders”

1Department of Neuropsychiatry, St. Marianna University, School of Medicine, Kanagawa, Japan
2Department of Psychiatry, Showa University Northern Yokohama Hospital, Kanagawa, Japan
3Tokyo Metropolitan Tobu Medical Center for Persons with Developmental/Multiple Disabilities, Tokyo, Japan
4Department of Psychiatry, Showa University East Hospital, Tokyo, Japan
5Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan
6Department of Pharmaceutical Therapeutics, Division of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan

Received 7 May 2016; Accepted 26 July 2016

Academic Editor: Per Odin

Copyright © 2016 Koji Hori et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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