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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2016, Article ID 6438783, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6438783
Research Article

Exposure to Early Life Stress Results in Epigenetic Changes in Neurotrophic Factor Gene Expression in a Parkinsonian Rat Model

Discipline of Human Physiology, School of Laboratory Medicine and Medical Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville Campus, Durban 4000, South Africa

Received 13 November 2015; Accepted 13 December 2015

Academic Editor: Antonio Pisani

Copyright © 2016 Thabisile Mpofana et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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