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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2016, Article ID 8716016, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8716016
Research Article

Comparative mRNA Expression of eEF1A Isoforms and a PI3K/Akt/mTOR Pathway in a Cellular Model of Parkinson’s Disease

Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400, Thailand

Received 14 October 2015; Revised 23 December 2015; Accepted 19 January 2016

Academic Editor: Hélio Teive

Copyright © 2016 Kawinthra Khwanraj et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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