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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2017, Article ID 4263795, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4263795
Review Article

Insights into the Mechanisms Involved in Protective Effects of VEGF-B in Dopaminergic Neurons

1Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA
2Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA
3Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Torsten Falk; ude.anozira.u@klaft

Received 6 January 2017; Accepted 14 March 2017; Published 3 April 2017

Academic Editor: Antonio Pisani

Copyright © 2017 Beatrice Caballero et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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