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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2017, Article ID 4697052, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4697052
Research Article

Determinants of Dyadic Relationship and Its Psychosocial Impact in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease and Their Spouses

1Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Novum Pl 5, Blickagången 6/Hälsovägen 7, 14157 Huddinge, Sweden
2Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
3Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Neurogeriatrics, Novum Pl 5, Blickagången 6/Hälsovägen 7, 14157 Huddinge, Sweden

Correspondence should be addressed to Michaela Karlstedt; es.ik@tdetslrak.aleahcim

Received 18 November 2016; Revised 8 January 2017; Accepted 17 January 2017; Published 14 February 2017

Academic Editor: Hélio Teive

Copyright © 2017 Michaela Karlstedt et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The caregiver-care receiver relationship (mutuality) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and its association with motor and non-motors symptoms, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and caregiver burden have not fully been investigated. The aim of our study was to explore if (1) the level of mutuality perceived by PD-patients and PD-partners differs, (2) different factors are associated with perceived mutuality by PD-patients and PD-partners, and (3) mutuality is associated with PD-patients health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and caregiver burden. We collected data on motor signs (UPDRS III), non-motor manifestations (NMSQuest), PD-patients’ cognition (IQCODE), mutuality scale (MS), PD-patients’ HRQoL (PDQ8), and caregiver burden (CB) from 51 PD dyads. Predictors were identified using multivariate regression analyses. Overall, the dyads rated their own mutuality as high with no significant difference between the dyads except for the dimension of reciprocity. PD-patients’ MS score () and NMSQuest ( ≤ .001) were significant predictors of PDQ8. Strongest predictor of CB was PD-partners’ MS score (<.001) and IQCODE (). In general, it seems that non-motor symptoms contribute to a larger extent to the mutual relationship in PD-affected dyads than motor disabilities.