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Pulmonary Medicine
Volume 2011, Article ID 858154, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/858154
Clinical Study

Patient Characteristics in Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension of the Newborn

1Department of Paediatric Cardiology, Beatrix Children's Hospital, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, 9700 RB Groningen, The Netherlands
2Department of Neonatology, Beatrix Children's Hospital, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, 9700 RB Groningen, The Netherlands

Received 14 December 2010; Revised 25 March 2011; Accepted 28 March 2011

Academic Editor: Irwin Reiss

Copyright © 2011 M. T. R. Roofthooft et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. To assess the impact of PPHN on mortality, morbidity, and behavioural skills. Methods. A retrospective observational study of 143 newborns with PPHN, over an 11-year period, using objective health-status data from medical records and family doctors, and subjective health status data from a standardized Child Behaviour Checklist. Results. The majority of patients were males, treated with inhaled nitric oxide had maladaptation/maldevelopment as pathophysiological mechanism and a gestational age >37 weeks. In term newborns, types of pathophysiological mechanism ( 𝑃 < . 0 0 1 ) and Oxygen Index ( 𝑃 = . 0 2 ) were independent predicting risk factors for PPHN-related mortality. Analysis of preexisting disease and outcome categories in term newborns showed only a significant correlation between the use of iNO and respiratory complaints ( 𝑃 = . 0 3 ), not confirmed by multivariate analysis and regression analysis. Conclusions. PPHN is a serious, often fatal condition. The incidence of PPHN in preterm newborns is high. In term survivors, PPHN had no additional role in morbidity/outcome.