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Pulmonary Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 325869, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/325869
Research Article

The Immediate Pulmonary Disease Pattern following Exposure to High Concentrations of Chlorine Gas

1Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, 800 Sumter Street, Room 210, Columbia, SC 29208, USA
2Medical University of South Carolina, 135 Cannon Street, Suite 405, P.O. Box 250838, Charleston, SC 29425, USA
3Division of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, University of Memphis, 301 Robison Hall, 3825 De Soto Avenue, Memphis, TN 38152, USA
4Asthmapolis, 612 W. Main Street, Suite 201, Madison, WI 53703, USA
5Department of Global Environmental Health Sciences, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, 1440 Canal Street, Suite 2100, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA

Received 11 September 2013; Accepted 4 November 2013

Academic Editor: Andrew Sandford

Copyright © 2013 Pallavi P. Balte et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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