PPAR Research

PPAR Research / 2007 / Article
Special Issue

PPARs, RXRs, and Stem Cells

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Review Article | Open Access

Volume 2007 |Article ID 061563 | https://doi.org/10.1155/2007/61563

Eimear M. Mullen, Peili Gu, Austin J. Cooney, "Nuclear Receptors in Regulation of Mouse ES Cell Pluripotency and Differentiation", PPAR Research, vol. 2007, Article ID 061563, 10 pages, 2007. https://doi.org/10.1155/2007/61563

Nuclear Receptors in Regulation of Mouse ES Cell Pluripotency and Differentiation

Academic Editor: Jeffrey M. Gimble
Received30 Apr 2007
Accepted11 Jun 2007
Published23 Aug 2007

Abstract

Embryonic stem (ES) cells have great therapeutic potential because they are capable of indefinite self-renewal and have the potential to differentiate into over 200 different cell types that compose the human body. The switch from the pluripotent phenotype to a differentiated cell involves many complex signaling pathways including those involving LIF/Stat3 and the transcription factors Sox2, Nanog and Oct-4. Many nuclear receptors play an important role in the maintenance of pluripotence (ERRβ, SF-1, LRH-1, DAX-1) repression of the ES cell phenotype (RAR, RXR, GCNF) and also the differentiation of ES cells (PPARγ). Here we review the roles of the nuclear receptors involved in regulating these important processes in ES cells.

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Copyright © 2007 Eimear M. Mullen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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