PPAR Research

PPAR Research / 2007 / Article
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PPARs, RXRs, and Stem Cells

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Research Article | Open Access

Volume 2007 |Article ID 081219 | https://doi.org/10.1155/2007/81219

K. R. Shockley, C. J. Rosen, G. A. Churchill, B. Lecka-Czernik, "PPARγ2 Regulates a Molecular Signature of Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells", PPAR Research, vol. 2007, Article ID 081219, 13 pages, 2007. https://doi.org/10.1155/2007/81219

PPARγ2 Regulates a Molecular Signature of Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

Academic Editor: Z. Elizabeth Floyd
Received23 Mar 2007
Accepted25 Apr 2007
Published23 Aug 2007

Abstract

Bone formation and hematopoiesis are anatomically juxtaposed and share common regulatory mechanisms. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) contain a compartment that provides progeny with bone forming osteoblasts and fat laden adipocytes as well as fibroblasts, chondrocytes, and muscle cells. In addition, marrow MSC provide an environment for support of hematopoiesis, including the development of bone resorbing osteoclasts. The PPARγ2 nuclear receptor is an adipocyte-specific transcription factor that controls marrow MSC lineage allocation toward adipocytes and osteoblasts. Increased expression of PPARγ2 with aging correlates with changes in the MSC status in respect to both their intrinsic differentiation potential and production of signaling molecules that contribute to the formation of a specific marrow microenvironment. Here, we investigated the effect of PPARγ2 on MSC molecular signature in respect to the expression of gene markers associated exclusively with stem cell phenotype, as well as genes involved in the formation of a stem cell supporting marrow environment. We found that PPARγ2 is a powerful modulator of stem cell-related gene expression. In general, PPARγ2 affects the expression of genes specific for the maintenance of stem cell phenotype, including LIF, LIF receptor, Kit ligand, SDF-1, Rex-1/Zfp42, and Oct-4. Moreover, the antidiabetic PPARγ agonist TZD rosiglitazone specifically affects the expression of “stemness” genes, including ABCG2, Egfr, and CD44. Our data indicate that aging and antidiabetic TZD therapy may affect mesenchymal stem cell phenotype through modulation of PPARγ2 activity. These observations may have important therapeutic consequences and indicate a need for more detailed studies of PPARγ2 role in stem cell biology.

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Copyright © 2007 K. R. Shockley et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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