PPAR Research

PPAR Research / 2007 / Article

Review Article | Open Access

Volume 2007 |Article ID 089369 | https://doi.org/10.1155/2007/89369

Asha Jacob, Rongqian Wu, Mian Zhou, Ping Wang, "Mechanism of the Anti-inflammatory Effect of Curcumin: PPAR-γ Activation", PPAR Research, vol. 2007, Article ID 089369, 5 pages, 2007. https://doi.org/10.1155/2007/89369

Mechanism of the Anti-inflammatory Effect of Curcumin: PPAR-γ Activation

Academic Editor: John P. Vanden Heuvel
Received04 Jun 2007
Accepted21 Nov 2007
Published17 Jan 2008

Abstract

Curcumin, the phytochemical component in turmeric, is used as a dietary spice and a topical ointment for the treatment of inflammation in India for centuries. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is relatively insoluble in water, but dissolves in acetone, dimethylsulphoxide, and ethanol. Commercial grade curcumin contains 10–20% curcuminoids, desmethoxycurcumin, and bisdesmethoxycurcumin and they are as effective as pure curcumin. Based on a number of clinical studies in carcinogenesis, a daily oral dose of 3.6 g curcumin has been efficacious for colorectal cancer and advocates its advancement into Phase II clinical studies. In addition to the anticancer effects, curcumin has been effective against a variety of disease conditions in both in vitro and in vivo preclinical studies. The present review highlights the importance of curcumin as an anti-inflammatory agent and suggests that the beneficial effect of curcumin is mediated by the upregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) activation.

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Copyright © 2007 Asha Jacob et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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