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PPAR Research
Volume 2007 (2007), Article ID 91240, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/91240
Review Article

Role of PPARs and Retinoid X Receptors in the Regulation of Lung Maturation and Development

1Division of Pulmonology, Allergy/Immunology, Cystic Fibrosis and Sleep, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta 30322, GA, USA
2Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston 02115, MA, USA

Received 6 March 2007; Accepted 9 May 2007

Academic Editor: Theodore J. Standiford

Copyright © 2007 Dawn M. Simon and Thomas J. Mariani. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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