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PPAR Research
Volume 2008, Article ID 473804, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/473804
Review Article

Potential Therapeutic Use of PPAR -Programed Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells in Cancer Vaccination Therapy

1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, 4010 Debrecen, Egyetem ter 1, Life Science Building, 4010 Debrecen, Hungary
2Apoptosis and Genomics Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Research Center for Molecular Medicine, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, 4010 Debrecen, Hungary

Received 15 July 2008; Accepted 22 September 2008

Academic Editor: Dipak Panigrahy

Copyright © 2008 Adrienn Gyöngyösi and László Nagy. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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