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PPAR Research
Volume 2008, Article ID 542694, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/542694
Review Article

PPAR and Proline Oxidase in Cancer

1Metabolism and Cancer Susceptibility Section, Laboratory of Comparative Carcinogenesis, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD 21702-1201, USA
2Basic Research Program, SAIC-Frederick, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD 21702-1201, USA

Received 30 April 2008; Accepted 11 June 2008

Academic Editor: Dipak Panigrahy

Copyright © 2008 James M. Phang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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