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PPAR Research
Volume 2011, Article ID 436358, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/436358
Research Article

Skeletal Effects of the Saturated 3-Thia Fatty Acid Tetradecylthioacetic Acid in Rats

1Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, MTFS, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU, Olav Kyrres gate 9, 7489 Trondheim, Norway
2Departments of Orthopedics and Internal Medicine, Erasmus University, 3000 DR, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
3Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, St. Olav's University Hospital, 7006 Trondheim, Norway
4Department of Medicine, University of Bergen, 5020 Bergen, Norway
5Department of Heart Diseases, Haukeland University Hospital, 5021 Bergen, Norway
6Department of Biomaterials, Institute for Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, 0317 Oslo, Norway
7Department of Endocrinology, St. Olav's University Hospital, 7030 Trondheim, Norway

Received 28 July 2011; Accepted 6 September 2011

Academic Editor: Beata Lecka-Czernik

Copyright © 2011 Astrid Kamilla Stunes et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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