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PPAR Research
Volume 2012, Article ID 596394, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/596394
Research Article

Expression Pattern of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors in Rat Hippocampus following Cerebral Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury

1The College of Pharmacy, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400010, China
2The College of Basic Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400010, China
3The First Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400010, China
4School of Nursing, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400010, China
5Department of Pharmacology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400010, China

Received 22 September 2012; Revised 30 October 2012; Accepted 14 November 2012

Academic Editor: Sheng Zhong Duan

Copyright © 2012 Hong Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The present study was designed to investigate the pattern of time-dependent expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARα, β, and γ) after global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) damage in the rat hippocampus. Male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were subjected to global cerebral I/R. The rat hippocampi were isolated to detect the expression of PPARs mRNA and protein levels at 30 min–30 d after I/R by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. The expression levels of PPARs mRNA and protein in the rat hippocampus significantly increased and peaked at 24 h for PPARα and γ (at 48 h for PPARβ) after I/R, then gradually decreased, and finally approached control levels on d 30. The present results suggest that global cerebral I/R can cause obvious increases of hippocampal PPARs mRNA and protein expression within 15 d after I/R. These findings may help to guide the experimental and clinical therapeutic use of PPARs agonists against brain injury.