Pain Research and Management
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate36%
Submission to final decision112 days
Acceptance to publication37 days
CiteScore1.620
Impact Factor1.701
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DNA Methylation May be Involved in the Analgesic Effect of Hyperbaric Oxygen via Regulating FUNDC1

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 Journal profile

Pain Research and Management publishes research focusing on laboratory and clinical findings in the field of pain research and the prevention and management of pain.

 Editor spotlight

Chief Editor, Professor Valeriani deals with clinical neurophysiology with a special interest in pain and headaches in children and adults and is currently a neurologist who works at the Bambi Gesu Children’s Hospital in Rome.

 Special Issues

We currently have a number of Special Issues open for submission. Special Issues highlight emerging areas of research within a field, or provide a venue for a deeper investigation into an existing research area.

Latest Articles

More articles
Research Article

Self-Compassion Demonstrating a Dual Relationship with Pain Dependent on High-Frequency Heart Rate Variability

One previous study indicated the significance of trait self-compassion in psychological well-being and adjustment in people with chronic pain. Higher-frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV) was found to be closely associated with self-compassion and pain coping. The current study was therefore designed to investigate the relationship between self-compassion and experimental pain as well as the impact of HF-HRV. Sixty healthy participants provided self-reported self-compassion and underwent a cold pain protocol during which HF-HRV was evaluated. Results demonstrated a dual relationship between self-compassion and pain, dependent on the level of HF-HRV during pain exposure. Specifically, self-compassion was associated with lower pain in the condition of higher HF-HRV, while there was an inverse relationship between self-compassion and pain when HF-HRV was lower. Our data indicate the significance of HF-HRV in moderating the association between self-compassion and experimental pain.

Review Article

Procedural Treatments for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Review of Current Injectable Therapies

Knee osteoarthritis is a common painful degenerative condition affecting the aging Canadian population. In addition to pain and disability, osteoarthritis is associated with depression, comorbid conditions such as diabetes, and increased caregiver burden. It is predicted to cost the Canadian healthcare system $7.6 billion dollars by 2031. Despite its high cost and prevalence, controversy persists in the medical community regarding optimal therapies to treat knee osteoarthritis. A variety of medications like nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories and opioids can cause severe side effects with limited benefits. Total knee arthroplasty, although a definitive management, comes with risk such as postoperative infections, revisions, and chronic pain. Newer injectable therapies are gaining attention as alternatives to medications because of a safer side effect profile and are much less invasive than a joint replacement. Platelet-rich plasma is beginning to replace the more common injectable therapies of intra-articular corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid, but larger trials are needed to confirm this effect. Small studies have examined prolotherapy and stem cell therapy and demonstrate some benefits. Trials involving genicular nerve block procedures have been successful. As treatments evolve, injectable therapies may offer a safe and effective pathway for patients suffering from knee osteoarthritis.

Research Article

Perceptions and Impact of the 2017 Canadian Guideline for Opioid Therapy and Chronic Noncancer Pain: A Cross-Sectional Study of Canadian Physicians

Background. Physician adherence to guideline recommendations for the use of opioids to manage chronic pain is often limited. Objective. In February 2018, we administered a 28-item online survey to explore perceptions of the 2017 Canadian guideline for opioid therapy and chronic noncancer pain and if physicians had altered practices in response to recommendations. Results. We invited 34,322 Canadian physicians to complete our survey, and 1,128 responded for a response rate of 3%; 687 respondents indicated they prescribed opioids for noncancer pain and answered survey questions about the guideline and their practice. Almost all were aware of the guideline, 94% had read the document, and 89% endorsed the clarity as good or excellent. The majority (86%) felt the guideline was feasible to implement, but 66% highlighted resistance by patients, and 63% the lack of access to effective nonopioid treatment as barriers. Thirty-six percent of respondents mistakenly believed the guideline recommended mandatory tapering for patients using high-dose opioid therapy (≥90 mg morphine equivalent per day), and 58% felt they would benefit from support for opioid tapering. Seventy percent of respondents had changed practices to align with guideline recommendations, with 51% engaging some high-dose patients in opioid tapering and 43% reducing the number of new opioid starts. Conclusion. There was high awareness of the 2017 Canadian opioid guideline among respondents, and preliminary evidence that recommendations have changed practice to better align with the evidence. Ongoing education is required to avoid the misunderstanding that opioid tapering is mandatory, and research to identify effective strategies to manage chronic noncancer pain is urgently needed.

Research Article

Final Year Nursing Students’ Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Children’s Pain

Pain is one of the commonest reasons why children visit the hospital. Inadequately treated pain in children can negatively affect their physical, psychological, and social well-being; it also places financial burden on families of affected children and healthcare systems in general. Considering the eventual suffering of vulnerable children and their families if nursing students are insufficiently educated and ill-prepared, the current study aimed at assessing final year nursing student’s knowledge and attitudes pertaining to pediatric pain. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among 100 final year undergraduate nursing students at a private university college in Ghana. In addition to their ages and gender, the students responded to the 42 individual items on the Pediatric Nurses’ Knowledge and Attitudes Survey regarding pain (PNKAS) instrument. Descriptive statistical analysis was aided by the Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 25 software. The mean age of the final year nursing students was 29 years (range of 21 to 47 years); a majority of them were females (78%). Participants had an average (SD) correct answer score of 44.0% (10.6%). Good pediatric pain knowledge and attitudes were observed in items that were related to the individualized and multidimensional nature of the pain experience and its treatment, benefits of pre-emptive analgesia, pharmacodynamics, and pain assessment. Poor pediatric pain knowledge and attitudes occurred in items that focused on pain perceptions, opioid drug administration, useful pain medications, pain physiology, and nonpharmacological pain management interventions. Final year nursing students have insufficient knowledge and attitudes toward children’s pain management. Areas of good and poor pediatric pain knowledge and attitudes should be considered when designing and implementing educational interventions on this subject. Curricular revisions should be made on existing nursing curriculum to lay more emphasis on children’s pain management and use educational interventions that support knowledge translation for improved care.

Review Article

Current and Emerging Pharmacotherapy for Fibromyalgia

Introduction. Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a pain disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1–5%. It is associated with a variety of somatic and psychological disorders. Its exact pathogenesis is still unclear but is involved with neural oversensitization and decreased conditioned pain modulation (CPM), combined with cognitive dysfunction, memory impairment, and altered information processing. Connectivity between brain areas involved in pain processing, alertness, and cognition is increased in the syndrome, making its pharmacologic therapy complex. Only three drugs, pregabalin, duloxetine, and milnacipran are currently FDA-approved for FM treatment, but many other agents have been tested over the years, with varying efficacy. Areas Covered. The purpose of this review is to summarize current clinical experience with different pharmacologic treatments used for fibromyalgia and introduce future perspectives in developing therapies. Expert Opinion. Future insights into the fields of cannabinoid and opioid research, as well as an integrative approach towards the incorporation of genetics and functional imaging combined with additional fields of research relevant towards the study of complex CNS disorders, are likely to lead to new developments of novel tailor-made treatments for FMS patients.

Research Article

Systematic Administration of B Vitamins Alleviates Diabetic Pain and Inhibits Associated Expression of P2X3 and TRPV1 in Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons and Proinflammatory Cytokines in Spinal Cord in Rats

Background. Treatment of diabetic neuropathic pain (DNP) continues to be a major challenge, and underlying mechanisms of DNP remain elusive. We investigated treatment effects of B vitamins on DPN- and DNP-associated alterations of neurochemical signaling in the nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and the spinal cord in rats. Methods. DNP was produced in male, adult, Sprague Dawley rats by single i.p. streptozotocin (STZ). Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry were used to analyze protein expressions in DRG and ELISA to measure the proinflammatory cytokines in the spinal cord. Behaviorally expressed DNP was determined by measuring the sensitivity of hindpaw skin to mechanical and thermal stimulation. Results. There were 87.5% (77/88) rats which developed high blood glucose within 1-2 weeks following STZ injection. Of which, 70.13% (n = 54/77) animals exhibited DNP manifested as mechanical allodynia and/or thermal hyperalgesia. Intraperitoneal administration of vitamins B1/B6/B12 (100/100/2 mg/kg, one or multiple doses) significantly attenuated DNP without affecting the blood glucose. Expressions of P2X3 and TRPV1 in CGRP-positive and IB4-positive DRG neurons as well as the interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and nerve growth factor in the lumbar spinal cord were greatly increased in DNP rats. Such DNP-associated neurochemical alterations were also greatly suppressed by the B-vitamin treatment. Conclusions. B-vitamin treatment can greatly suppress chronic DNP and DNP-associated increased activities of P2X3 and TRPV1 in DRG and the spinal proinflammatory cytokines, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of DNP. Systematic administration of B vitamins can be a strategy for DNP management in clinic.

Pain Research and Management
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate36%
Submission to final decision112 days
Acceptance to publication37 days
CiteScore1.620
Impact Factor1.701
 Submit