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Pain Research and Management
Volume 2016, Article ID 2157950, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2157950
Research Article

The McGill University Health Centre Cancer Pain Clinic: A Retrospective Analysis of an Interdisciplinary Approach to Cancer Pain Management

1Cancer Pain Clinic, Division of Supportive and Palliative Care, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada
2Alan Edwards Pain Management Unit, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada
3JSS Medical Research, Saint Laurent, QC, Canada

Received 14 September 2015; Accepted 30 December 2015

Copyright © 2016 Jordi Perez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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