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Pain Research and Management
Volume 2016, Article ID 5187631, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5187631
Research Article

Identification and Characterization of Unique Subgroups of Chronic Pain Individuals with Dispositional Personality Traits

1Western University, London, ON, Canada N6A 3K7
2St. Joseph’s Health Care London, London, ON, Canada N6A 4V2
3Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON, Canada N6C 0A7

Received 18 August 2015; Accepted 5 December 2015

Copyright © 2016 S. Mehta et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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