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Pain Research and Management
Volume 2016, Article ID 8714785, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8714785
Research Article

Finding Ways to Lift Barriers to Care for Chronic Pain Patients: Outcomes of Using Internet-Based Self-Management Activities to Reduce Pain and Improve Quality of Life

1Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, 500 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1V7
2Multi-Disciplinary Pain Management Centers, Toronto Poly Clinic, 5460 Yonge Street, Unit 204, Toronto, ON, Canada M2N 6K7

Received 13 October 2015; Accepted 29 December 2015

Copyright © 2016 Kevin Rod. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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