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Pain Research and Management
Volume 2017, Article ID 2752658, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2752658
Research Article

Noradrenaline, Serotonin, GABA, and Glycine in Cerebrospinal Fluid during Labor Pain: A Cross-Sectional Prospective Study

1Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok, Thailand
2Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok, Thailand

Correspondence should be addressed to Sittisak Honsawek; ht.ca.aluhc@h.kasittis

Received 19 January 2017; Revised 4 May 2017; Accepted 24 May 2017; Published 18 June 2017

Academic Editor: Peter Drummond

Copyright © 2017 Pornpan Chalermkitpanit et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background and Aims. The inhibitory pathways that play a role in spinal modulation include local interneurons and descending control. Clinical data regarding the role of these pathways in acute pain is lacking. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to evaluate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of noradrenaline, serotonin, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glycine in parturients with labor pain compared to those without labor pain. Methods. One hundred term uncomplicated pregnant women receiving spinal anesthesia for cesarean section were enrolled in this prospective cross-sectional study. CSF noradrenaline, serotonin, GABA, and glycine levels were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Labor pain score was assessed by numerical rating scale. Results. Median CSF serotonin concentration in parturients with labor pain was significantly lower than in those without pain (). Median CSF glycine level in the labor pain group was significantly higher than in the control group (). There were no significant differences in median CSF level of noradrenaline or GABA between parturients with and without labor pain. Subsequent analysis showed labor pain scores to be negatively correlated with CSF serotonin (, ) but positively correlated with CSF glycine (, ). Conclusion. CSF serotonin and glycine were significantly correlated with labor pain scores. These findings suggest that the serotonergic and glycinergic systems may play a role in spinal modulation of visceral pain.