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Pain Research and Management
Volume 2017, Article ID 7429761, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7429761
Research Article

Neural Mobilization Treatment Decreases Glial Cells and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression in the Central Nervous System in Rats with Neuropathic Pain Induced by CCI in Rats

1Department of Anatomy, Laboratory of Functional Neuroanatomy of Pain, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
2University Nove de Julho, São Paulo, SP, Brazil

Correspondence should be addressed to Marucia Chacur; rb.psu.bci@mrucahc

Received 27 September 2016; Revised 8 February 2017; Accepted 20 February 2017; Published 22 March 2017

Academic Editor: Peter Drummond

Copyright © 2017 Aline Carolina Giardini et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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