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Pain Research and Management
Volume 2018, Article ID 6358624, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/6358624
Review Article

“Brave Men” and “Emotional Women”: A Theory-Guided Literature Review on Gender Bias in Health Care and Gendered Norms towards Patients with Chronic Pain

1Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg SE-405 30, Sweden
2Centre for Healthcare Improvment, Division of Service Management and Logistics, Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg SE-412 96, Sweden

Correspondence should be addressed to Anke Samulowitz; es.noigergv@ztiwolumas.ekna

Received 20 October 2017; Revised 13 January 2018; Accepted 21 January 2018; Published 25 February 2018

Academic Editor: Parisa Gazerani

Copyright © 2018 Anke Samulowitz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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