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Pain Research and Management
Volume 2018, Article ID 6841985, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/6841985
Review Article

The Underestimated Significance of Conditioning in Placebo Hypoalgesia and Nocebo Hyperalgesia

1Department for Clinical Psychology, Psychotherapy, and Experimental Psychopathology, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany
2Department of Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany

Correspondence should be addressed to Anne-Kathrin Bräscher; ed.zniam-inu@hcsearba

Received 13 October 2017; Accepted 20 December 2017; Published 28 January 2018

Academic Editor: Federica Galli

Copyright © 2018 Anne-Kathrin Bräscher et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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