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Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 123405, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/123405
Review Article

Temperature-Driven Models for Insect Development and Vital Thermal Requirements

Laboratory of Applied Zoology and Parasitology, Department of Plant Protection, Faculty of Agriculture, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece

Received 15 July 2011; Revised 9 September 2011; Accepted 11 September 2011

Academic Editor: Nikos T. Papadopoulos

Copyright © 2012 Petros Damos and Matilda Savopoulou-Soultani. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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