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Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 215891, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/215891
Research Article

Vertically Stratified Ash-Limb Beetle Fauna in Northern Ohio

1Department of Entomology, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, The Ohio State University, Wooster, OH 44691, USA
2Southern Research Station, USDA Forest Service, Starkville, MS 39759, USA
3Department of Genetics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA
4Georgia Museum of Natural History, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA

Received 29 May 2012; Accepted 9 June 2012

Academic Editor: Martin H. Villet

Copyright © 2012 Michael D. Ulyshen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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