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Psyche
Volume 2012, Article ID 383757, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/383757
Research Article

Impact of Interference Competition on Exploration and Food Exploitation in the Ant Lasius niger

1Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition Animale, UPS, Université de Toulouse, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9, France
2Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition Animale, CNRS, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9, France
3Service d’Ecologie Sociale (CP 231), Université Libre de Bruxelles, 50 Avenue F Roosevelt, 1050 Bruxelles, Belgium

Received 4 February 2012; Accepted 1 March 2012

Academic Editor: Felipe Andrés León Contrera

Copyright © 2012 Vincent Fourcassié et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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