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Volume 2012, Article ID 480483, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/480483
Research Article

Effective Larval Foraging in Large, Low-Diet Environments by Anopheles gambiae

1Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
2Atlanta Research & Education Foundation (AREF), 1670 Clairmont Road (151F), Decatur, GA 30033, USA
3Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale e Scienze Biochimiche, Università Degli Studi di Perugia, Via del Giochetto, 06122 Perugia, Italy

Received 11 August 2011; Accepted 17 October 2011

Academic Editor: G. B. Dunphy

Copyright © 2012 A. C. Sutcliffe and M. Q. Benedict. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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