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Volume 2012, Article ID 481509, 23 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/481509
Research Article

Butterfly Diversity from Farmlands of Central Uganda

1Department of Biology and Environment, National Center for Research in Natural Sciences, CRSN-Lwiro, D.S. Bukavu, Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo
2Département de Nutrition et Dietetiques, Centre de Recherche pour la Promotion de la Santé, Institut Supérieur des Techniques Médicales, ISTM Bukavu, Sud-Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo
3Department of Environmental Management, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda

Received 9 October 2011; Accepted 31 May 2012

Academic Editor: Robert Matthews

Copyright © 2012 M. B. Théodore Munyuli. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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