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Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 495805, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/495805
Research Article

Plant Feeding in an Omnivorous Mirid, Dicyphus hesperus: Why Plant Context Matters

1Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, P.O. Box 1000, Agassiz, BC, Canada V0M 1A0
2Department of Biology, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada N9B 3P4
3Department of Biology, Douglas College, P.O. Box 2503, New Westminster, BC, Canada V3L 5B2
4Evolutionary and Behavioural Ecology Research Group, Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada V5A 1S6

Received 2 August 2012; Accepted 30 August 2012

Academic Editor: Kleber Del-Claro

Copyright © 2012 David R. Gillespie et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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