Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Psyche
Volume 2012, Article ID 746342, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/746342
Research Article

The Influence of Abiotic Factors on an Invasive Pest of Pulse Crops, Sitona lineatus (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), in North America

1Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Saskatoon Research Centre, 107 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 0X2
2Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge Research Centre, 5403 1st Avenue South, Lethbridge, AB, Canada T1J 4B1
3Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development, Brooks Research Centre, 131 S.S. No.4 Brooks, AB, Canada T1R 1E6

Received 15 July 2011; Revised 23 September 2011; Accepted 27 September 2011

Academic Editor: Nikos T. Papadopoulos

Copyright © 2012 O. Olfert et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. F. Europaea, http://www.faunaeur.org.
  2. J. Botha, D. Hardie, and F. Casella, “The pea leaf weevil, Sitona lineatus: exotic threat to Western Australia,” Government of Western Australia Department of Agriculture Factsheet 11, Government of Western Australia Department of Agriculture, Perth, Australia, 2004. View at Google Scholar
  3. E. R. Hoebeke and A. G. Wheeler Jr., “Sitona lineatus (L.), the pea leaf weevil: first records in eastern North America (coleoptera: curculionidae),” Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington, vol. 87, no. 2, pp. 216–220, 1985. View at Google Scholar
  4. M. Vankosky, L. M. Dosdall, and H. A. Cárcamo, “Distribution, biology and integrated management of the pea leaf weevil, Sitona lineatus L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), with an analysis of research needs,” CAB Reviews, vol. 4, no. 7, pp. 1–18, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. B. S. Nielsen, “Yield responses of Vicia faba in relation to infestation levels of Sitona lineatus L. (Col., Curculionidae),” Journal of Applied Entomology, vol. 110, no. 3, pp. 398–407, 1990. View at Google Scholar
  6. N. Hamon, R. Bardner, L. Allen-Williams, and J. B. Lee, “Flight periodicity and infestation size of Sitona lineatus,” Annals of Applied Biology, vol. 111, no. 2, pp. 271–284, 1987. View at Google Scholar
  7. F. Landon, J. Levieux, J. Huignard, D. Rougan, and P. Taupin, “Feeding activity of Sitona lineatus L. (Col., Curculionidae) on Pisum sativum L. (Leguminosae) during its imaginal life,” Journal of Applied Entomology, vol. 19, no. 7, pp. 515–522, 1995. View at Google Scholar
  8. H. A. Cárcamo and S. Meers, “The first insect pest of pulse crops in Alberta: the pea leaf weevil,” Agronomy Update, vol. 2007, pp. 82–88, 2007. View at Google Scholar
  9. H. A. Cárcamo, M. A. Vankosky, C. Herle, K. Coles, S. Meers, and O. Olfert, “Integrated management of the pea leaf weevil in pea fields,” Final Report for ACIDF, Alberta and Saskatchewan Pulse Grower Commissions, and AAFC-Matching Investment Initiative, 2010. View at Google Scholar
  10. M. A. Vankosky, H. A. Cárcamo, and L. M. Dosdall, “Identification of potential natural enemies of the pea leaf weevil, Sitona lineatus L. in western Canada,” Journal of Applied Entomology, vol. 135, no. 4, pp. 293–301, 2011. View at Google Scholar
  11. M. A. Vankosky, H. A. Cárcamo, R. H. McKenzie, and L. M. Dosdall, “Integrated management of Sitona lineatus with nitrogen fertilizer, Rhizobium, and thiamethoxam insecticide,” Agronomy Journal, vol. 103, no. 2, pp. 565–572, 2011. View at Google Scholar
  12. H. G. Andrewartha and L. E. Birch, The Distribution and Abundance of Animals, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, Ill, USA, 1954.
  13. A. M. Mika, R. M. Weiss, O. Olfert, R. H. Hallett, and J. A. Newman, “Will climate change be beneficial or detrimental to the invasive swede midge in North America? Contrasting predictions using climate projections from different general circulation models,” Global Change Biology, vol. 14, no. 8, pp. 1721–1733, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. R. W. Sutherst, G. F. Maywald, and D. J. Kriticos, CLIMEX Version 3 User's Guide, Hearne Scientific Software Pty Ltd., 2007.
  15. O. Olfert, R. M. Weiss, S. Woods, H. Philip, and L. Dosdall, “Potential distribution and relative abundance of an invasive cereal crop pest, Oulema melanopus (coleoptera: chrysomelidae), in Canada,” Canadian Entomologist, vol. 136, no. 2, pp. 277–287, 2004. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. R. W. Sutherst and G. Maywald, “A climate model of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren (hymenoptera: formicidae): implications for invasion of new regions, particularly Oceania,” Environmental Entomology, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 317–335, 2005. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. D. W. McKenney, A. A. Hopkin, K. L. Campbell, B. G. Mackey, and R. Foottit, “Opportunities for improved risk assessments of exotic species in Canada using bioclimatic modeling,” Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, vol. 88, no. 1–3, pp. 445–461, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. O. Olfert, R. Hallett, R. M. Weiss, J. Soroka, and S. Goodfellow, “Potential distribution and relative abundance of swede midge, Contarinia nasturtii, an invasive pest in Canada,” Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, vol. 120, no. 3, pp. 221–228, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. P. G. Mason, O. Olfert, L. Sluchinski et al., “Actual and potential distribution of an invasive canola pest, Meligethes viridescens (coleoptera: nitidulidae), in Canada,” Canadian Entomologist, vol. 135, no. 3, pp. 405–413, 2003. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. B. S. Nielsen and T. S. Jensen, “Spring dispersal of Sitona lineatus: the use of aggregation pheromone traps for monitoring,” Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, vol. 66, no. 1, pp. 21–30, 1993. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. J. R. Fisher, The population dynamics of the pea leaf weevil Sitona lineatus (L.) in northern Idaho and eastern Washington, Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho, USA, 1977.
  22. H. W. Prescott and M. M. Reeher, The Pea Leaf Weevil: An Introduced Pest of Legumes in the Pacific Northwest, United States Department of Agriculture, Harrisburg, Pa, USA, 1961.
  23. V. H. Hans, “Beitrage zur biologie von Sitona lineatus L.,” Zeitschrift für angewandte Entomologie, vol. 44, pp. 343–386, 1959. View at Google Scholar
  24. D. J. Jackson, “Bionomics of weevils of the genus Sitones injurious to leguminous crops in Britain,” Annals of Applied Biology, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 269–298, 1920. View at Google Scholar
  25. D. J. Schotzko and S. S. Quisenberry, “Pea leaf weevil (coleoptera: curculionidae) spatial distribution in peas,” Environmental Entomology, vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 477–484, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. J. Lerin, “Modeling embryonic development in Sitona lineatus (coleoptera: curculionidae) in fluctuating temperatures,” Environmental Entomology, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 107–112, 2004. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. O. Olfert, S. Meers, H. A. Cárcamo, and S. Hartley, “Pea leaf weevil in Alberta and Saskatchewan in 2009,” in 2009 Crop Variety Highlights and Insect Pest Forecasts. Technical Bulletin No. 2010-01, pp. 18–19, Saskatoon Research Centre, Saskatoon, Canada, 2010. View at Google Scholar
  28. M. New, M. Hulme, and P. Jones, “Representing twentieth-century space-time climate variability. Part I: development of a 1961–1990 mean monthly terrestrial climatology,” Journal of Climate, vol. 12, no. 2-3, pp. 829–856, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. G. L. Baskerville and P. Emin, “Rapid estimation of heat accumulation from maximum and minimum temperatures,” Ecology, vol. 50, no. 4, pp. 514–517, 1969. View at Google Scholar
  30. IPCC, Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis, Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 2007.
  31. P. H. Whetton, K. L. McInnes, and R. N. Jones, Australian Climate Change Projections for Impact Assessment and Policy Application: A Review, CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, Melbourne, Australia, 2005.
  32. D. J. Kritcos, N. S. Alexander, and S. M. Kolomeitz, “Predicting the potential geographic distribution of weeds in 2080,” in Proceedings of the 15th Australian Weeds Conference, Weed Science Society of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia, 2006.
  33. ESRI Inc., ArcView, Version 8.1, Redlands, California: Environmental Systems Research Institute Incorporated, 2001.
  34. M. Markkula and S. Roivainen, “The effect of temperature, food plants, and starvation on the oviposition of some Sitona (Col., curculionidae) species,” Annales Entomologici Fennici, vol. 27, pp. 30–45, 1961. View at Google Scholar
  35. Pulse Canada, http://www.pulsecanada.com/statistics.
  36. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Drought Watch, Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration, http://www.agr.gc.ca/pfra/drought/maps/archives/e2030831.pdf .
  37. O. Olfert, S. Meers, H. A. Cárcamo, and S. Hartley, “Pea leaf weevil in Alberta and Saskatchewan in 2008,” in 2008 Crop Variety Highlights and Insect Pest Forecasts. Technical Bulletin No. 2009-01, Saskatoon Research Centre, Saskatoon, Canada, 2009. View at Google Scholar
  38. O. Olfert, S. Meers, H. A. Cárcamo, and S. Hartley, “Pea leaf weevil in Alberta and Saskatchewan in 2007,” in 2007 Crop Variety Highlights and Insect Pest Forecasts. Technical Bulletin No. 2008-01, pp. 18–19, Saskatoon Research Centre, Saskatoon, Canada, 2008. View at Google Scholar
  39. O. Olfert, R. M. Weiss, and D. Kriticos, “Application of general circulation models to assess the potential impact of climate change on potential distribution and relative abundance of Melanoplus sanguinipes (fabricius) (orthoptera: acrididae) in North America,” Psyche, vol. 2011, Article ID 980372, 9 pages, 2011. View at Google Scholar
  40. O. Olfert and R. M. Weiss, “Impact of climate change on potential distributions and relative abundances of Oulema melanopus, Meligethes viridescens and Ceutorhynchus obstrictus in Canada,” Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment, vol. 113, no. 1–4, pp. 295–301, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. J. M. Jeschke and D. L. Strayer, “Usefulness of bioclimatic models for studying climate change and invasive species,” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 1134, pp. 1–24, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. R. G. Pearson and T. P. Dawson, “Predicting the impacts of climate change on the distribution of species: are bioclimate envelope models useful?” Global Ecology and Biogeography, vol. 12, no. 5, pp. 361–371, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. Western Committee on Crop Pests, http://www.westernforum.org/IPMNMain.html.