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Volume 2012, Article ID 752815, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/752815
Research Article

The Biology and Natural History of Aphaenogaster rudis

1Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Connecticut 75 North Eagleville Road, U-43, Storrs, CT 06269-3043, USA
2Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA

Received 16 October 2011; Accepted 11 November 2011

Academic Editor: Diana E. Wheeler

Copyright © 2012 David Lubertazzi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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