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Volume 2012, Article ID 898721, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/898721
Research Article

Nectar Meals of a Mosquito-Specialist Spider

1Department of Biological Sciences, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Nairobi 00200, Kenya
2International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology, Thomas Odhiambo Campus, Mbita Point 40350, Kenya
3School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand

Received 10 September 2012; Accepted 8 November 2012

Academic Editor: Louis S. Hesler

Copyright © 2012 Josiah O. Kuja et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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