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References

  1. T. Munyuli, “Climatic, regional land-use intensity, landscape, and local variables predicting best the occurrence and distribution of bee community diversity in various farmland habitats in Uganda,” Psyche, vol. 2013, Article ID 564528, 38 pages, 2013.
Psyche
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 564528, 38 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/564528
Research Article

Climatic, Regional Land-Use Intensity, Landscape, and Local Variables Predicting Best the Occurrence and Distribution of Bee Community Diversity in Various Farmland Habitats in Uganda

1Academic Affairs and Research Program, Cinquantenaire University (UNI-50/Lwiro), D.S. Bukavu, South-Kivu Province, Democratic Republic of Congo
2Department of Biological, Agricultural and Environment Sciences, National Center for Research in Natural Sciences (CRSN/Lwiro), D.S. Bukavu, South-Kivu Province, Democratic Republic of Congo
3Centre of research for health promotion (CRPS), Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Bukavu Higher Institute of Medical Techniques (ISTM/Bukavu), P.O. Box 3036, Bukavu, South-Kivu Province, Democratic Republic of Congo
4Department of Environmental and Natural Resource Economics, Faculty of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, Namasagali Campus, Busitema University, P.O. Box 236, Tororo, Uganda

Received 8 September 2012; Revised 14 December 2012; Accepted 17 December 2012

Academic Editor: Fernando B. Noll

Copyright © 2013 M. B. Théodore Munyuli. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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