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Psyche
Volume 2013, Article ID 573541, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/573541
Research Article

Discrimination of the Social Parasite Ectatomma parasiticum by Its Host Sibling Species (E. tuberculatum)

1Laboratoire d’Ethologie Expérimentale et Comparée, EA 4443, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 99 avenue J.-B. Clément, 93430 Villetaneuse, France
2Departamento de Entomologia, Instituto de Ecologia, Antigua Carretera a Coatepec Km 2.5, A. 63, 91000 Xalapa, Ver, Mexico

Received 6 March 2013; Revised 30 April 2013; Accepted 15 May 2013

Academic Editor: Jean-Paul Lachaud

Copyright © 2013 Renée Fénéron et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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