Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Psyche
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 768108, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/768108
Research Article

Social Learning in Bumblebees (Bombus impatiens): Worker Bumblebees Learn to Manipulate and Forage at Artificial Flowers by Observation and Communication within the Colony

Canadian Pollination Initiative (CANPOLIN), School of Environmental Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1

Received 17 May 2013; Revised 7 September 2013; Accepted 8 September 2013

Academic Editor: James C. Nieh

Copyright © 2013 Hamida B. Mirwan and Peter G. Kevan. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. S. J. Shettleworth, Cognition, Evolution, and Behavior, Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, 1998.
  2. A. Whiten and R. Ham, “On the nature and evolution of imitation in the animal kingdom: reappraisal of a century of research,” Advances in the Study of Behavior, vol. 21, no. C, pp. 239–283, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. A. Bandura, Social Learning Theory, General Learning Press, New York, NY, USA, 1977.
  4. A. Bandura, Social Foundations of Thought and Action, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, USA, 1986.
  5. L. A. Giraldeau and T. Caraco, Social Foraging Theory, Princeton University Press, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, USA, 2000.
  6. L. A. Giraldeau, T. Caraco, and T. J. Valone, “Social foraging—individual learning and cultural transmission of innovations,” Behavioral Ecology, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 35–43, 1994. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. L. Lefebvre, “The opening of milk bottles by birds: evidence for accelerating learning rates, but against the wave-of-advance model of cultural transmission,” Behavioural Processes, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 43–53, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. C. Heyes and B. J. Galef, Social Learning and the Roots of Culture, Academic Press, San Diego, Calif, USA, 1996.
  9. E. Leadbeater and L. Chittka, “Social transmission of nectar-robbing behaviour in bumble-bees,” Proceedings of the Royal Society, vol. 275, no. 1643, pp. 1669–1674, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. E. Leadbeater and L. Chittka, “Do inexperienced bumblebee foragers use scent marks as social information?” Animal Cognition, vol. 14, no. 6, pp. 915–919, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. M. Giurfa, “Social learning in insects: a higher-order capacity,” Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, vol. 6, article 57, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  12. M. Baude, I. Dajoz, and É. Danchin, “Inadvertent social information in foraging bumblebees: effects of flower distribution and implications for pollination,” Animal Behaviour, vol. 76, no. 6, pp. 1863–1873, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. M. Giurfa, “Cognitive neuroethology: dissecting non-elemental learning in a honeybee brain,” Current Opinion in Neurobiology, vol. 13, no. 6, pp. 726–735, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. R. Menzel, G. Leboulle, and D. Eisenhardt, “Small brains, bright minds,” Cell, vol. 124, no. 2, pp. 237–239, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. P. G. Kevan and R. Menzel, “The plight of pollination and the interface of neurobiology, ecology and food security,” Environmentalist, vol. 32, no. 3, pp. 300–310, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. K. von Frisch, The Dance Language and Orientation of Bees, Belknap Press, Cambridge, Mass, USA, 1993.
  17. R. W. K. Punchihewa, N. Koeniger, P. G. Kevan, and R. M. Gadawski, “Observations on the dance communication and natural foraging ranges of the three honeybee species in Sri Lanka,” Journal of Apicultural Research, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 168–175, 1985. View at Google Scholar
  18. I. Aguilar and D. Briceño, “Sounds in Melipona costaricensis (Apidae: Meliponini): effect of sugar concentration and nectar source distance,” Apidologie, vol. 33, no. 4, pp. 375–388, 2002. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. J. C. Nieh, “Recruitment communication in stingless bees (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponini),” Apidologie, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 159–182, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. D. E. Jackson and F. L. W. Ratnieks, “Communication in ants,” Current Biology, vol. 16, no. 15, pp. R570–R574, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. R. L. Jeanne, “Chemical communication during swarm emigration in the social wasp Polybia sericea (Olivier),” Animal Behaviour, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 102–113, 1981. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. H. Schöne and J. Tengo, “Competition of males, courtship behaviour and chemical communication in the digger wasp Bembix rostrata ( Hymenoptera, Sphecidae),” Behaviour, vol. 77, pp. 44–66, 1981. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. G. Fiorito and P. Scotto, “Observational learning in Octopus vulgaris,” Science, vol. 256, no. 5056, pp. 545–547, 1992. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. T. M. Laverty, “Bumble bee learning and flower morphology,” Animal Behaviour, vol. 47, no. 3, pp. 531–545, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. A. Dornhaus and L. Chittka, “Information flow and regulation of foraging activity in bumble bees (Bombus spp.),” Apidologie, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 183–192, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. A. Dornhaus and L. Chittka, “Bumble bees (Bombus terrestris) store both food and information in honeypots,” Behavioral Ecology, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 661–666, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. E. Leadbeater and L. Chittka, “Social information use in foraging insects,” in Food Exploitation by Social Insects: Ecological, Behavioral, and Theoretical Approaches, S. Jarau and M. Hrncir, Eds., CRC Press, Boca Raton, Fla, USA, 2009. View at Google Scholar
  28. D. F. Sherry, “Social learning: nectar robbing spreads socially in bumble bees,” Current Biology, vol. 18, no. 14, pp. R608–R610, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. B. D. Worden and D. R. Papaj, “Flower choice copying in bumblebees,” Biology Letters, vol. 1, no. 4, pp. 504–507, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. T. D. Wyatt, Pheromones and Animal Behaviour: Communication by Smell and Taste, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 2003.
  31. S. A. Cameron, “Chemical signals in bumble bee foraging,” Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 257–260, 1981. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. D. Goulson, S. A. Hawson, and J. C. Stout, “Foraging bumblebees avoid flowers already visited by conspecifics or by other bumblebee species,” Animal Behaviour, vol. 55, no. 1, pp. 199–206, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. J. Wilms and T. Eltz, “Foraging scent marks of bumblebees: footprint cues rather than pheromone signals,” Naturwissenschaften, vol. 95, no. 2, pp. 149–153, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. M. A. Renner and J. C. Nieh, “Bumble bee olfactory information flow and contact-based foraging activation,” Insectes Sociaux, vol. 55, no. 4, pp. 417–424, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. U. Schmitt and A. Bertsch, “Do foraging bumblebees scent-mark food sources and does it matter?” Oecologia, vol. 82, no. 1, pp. 137–144, 1990. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. U. Schmitt, G. Lübke, and W. Francke, “Tarsal secretion marks food sources in bumblebees (Hymenoptera: Apidae),” Chemoecology, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 35–40, 1991. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. D. Goulson, J. C. Stout, J. Langley, and W. O. H. Hughes, “Identity and function of scent marks deposited by foraging bumblebees,” Journal of Chemical Ecology, vol. 26, no. 12, pp. 2897–2911, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. S. Witjes and T. Eltz, “Influence of scent deposits on flower choice: experiments in an artificial flower array with bumblebees,” Apidologie, vol. 38, no. 1, pp. 12–18, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. K. Rohrseitz and J. Tautz, “Honey bee dance communication: waggle run direction coded in antennal contacts?” Journal of Comparative Physiology, vol. 184, no. 4, pp. 463–470, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. M. Hrncir, S. Jarau, R. Zucchi, and F. G. Barth, “Recruitment behavior in stingless bees, Melipona scutellaris and M. quadrifasciata II. Possible mechanisms of communication,” Apidologie, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 93–113, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. V. M. Schmidt, R. Zucchi, and F. G. Barth, “Recruitment in a scent trail laying stingless bee (Scaptotrigona aff. depilis): Changes with reduction but not with increase of the energy gain,” Apidologie, vol. 37, no. 4, pp. 487–500, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. R. J. De Marco and W. M. Farina, “Trophallaxis in forager honeybees (Apis mellifera): resource uncertainty enhances begging contacts?” Journal of Comparative Physiology, vol. 189, no. 2, pp. 125–134, 2003. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. A. G. Hart and F. L. W. Ratnieks, “Task-partitioned nectar transfer in stingless bees: work organisation in a phylogenetic context,” Ecological Entomology, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 163–168, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. M. Baude, É. Danchin, M. Mugabo, and I. Dajoz, “Conspecifics as informers and competitors: an experimental study in foraging bumble-bees,” Proceedings of the Royal Society B, vol. 278, no. 1719, pp. 2806–2813, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  45. L. G. Kawaguchi, K. Ohashi, and Y. Toquenaga, “Do bumble bees save time when choosing novel flowers by following conspecifics?” Functional Ecology, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 239–244, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. E. Leadbeater and L. Chittka, “The dynamics of social learning in an insect model, the bumblebee (Bombus terrestris),” Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, vol. 61, no. 11, pp. 1789–1796, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  47. A. D. Brian, “Differences in the flowers visited by four species of bumble-bees and their causes,” Journal of Animal Ecology, vol. 26, pp. 71–98, 1957. View at Google Scholar
  48. E. Leadbeater and L. Chittka, “A new mode of information transfer in foraging bumblebees,” Current Biology, vol. 15, no. 12, pp. R447–R448, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  49. M. Giurfa, S. Zhang, A. Jenett, R. Menzel, and M. V. Srinivasan, “The concepts of “sameness” and “difference” in an insect,” Nature, vol. 410, no. 6831, pp. 930–933, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  50. M. Srinivasan and S. Zhang, “Small brains, smart minds: vision, perception and “cognition” in honeybees,” IETE Journal of Research, vol. 49, no. 2-3, pp. 127–134, 2003. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus