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Psychiatry Journal
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 565191, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/565191
Clinical Study

Cognitive Performance in a Subclinical Obsessive-Compulsive Sample 1: Cognitive Functions

1National Centre for Occupational Rehabilitation, Haddlandsvegen 20, 3864 Rauland, Norway
2Research Center for Behavioral Economics, FOM Hochschule, Grüneburgweg 102, 60323 Frankfurt am Main, Germany

Received 31 January 2013; Revised 12 June 2013; Accepted 15 June 2013

Academic Editor: Umberto Albert

Copyright © 2013 Thomas Johansen and Winand H. Dittrich. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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