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Psychiatry Journal
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 979623, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/979623
Research Article

Age Differences in the Association of Severe Psychological Distress and Behavioral Factors with Heart Disease

Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, P.O. Box 70259, Lamb Hall, Johnson City, TN 37614-1700, USA

Received 9 December 2012; Revised 19 February 2013; Accepted 21 February 2013

Academic Editor: Phillipa J. Hay

Copyright © 2013 Liang Wang and Ke-Sheng Wang. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Few studies have examined the risk factors of serious psychological distress (SPD) and behavioral factors for heart disease separately stratified as young (18–44 years), middle aged (45–64 years), and elderly (65 years or older). A total of 3,540 adults with heart disease and 37,703 controls were selected from the 2005 California Health Interview Survey. Data were weighted to be representative and adjusted for potential undercoverage and nonresponse biases. Multiple logistic regression models were used to estimate the associations of the factors with heart disease at different ages. The prevalence of SPD was 8% in cases and 4% in controls, respectively. For young adults, SPD and higher federal poverty level (FPL) were associated with an increased risk of heart disease while for middle-aged adults, SPD, past smoking, lack of physical activity, obesity, male, and unemployment were associated with an increased risk of heart disease. In addition, SPD, past smoking, lack of physical activity, obesity, male, unemployment, White, and lower FPL were associated with an increased risk of heart disease in elderly. Our findings indicate that risk factors for heart disease vary across all ages. Intervention strategies that target risk reduction of heart disease may be tailored accordingly.