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Psychiatry Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 296862, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/296862
Clinical Study

Brain Circulation during Panic Attack: A Transcranial Doppler Study with Clomipramine Challenge

1Psychiatry Unit, Careggi University Hospital, Largo Brambilla 3, 50100 Florence, Italy
2Neurology Unit, Careggi University Hospital, Largo Brambilla 3, 50100 Florence, Italy
3Section of Psychology and Psychiatry, Department of Health Sciences, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini 6, 50139 Florence, Italy

Received 31 October 2013; Revised 23 January 2014; Accepted 11 February 2014; Published 16 March 2014

Academic Editor: Jayne Bailey

Copyright © 2014 Francesco Rotella et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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