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Psychiatry Journal
Volume 2015, Article ID 968596, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/968596
Research Article

Acceptance and Avoidance Processes at Different Levels of Psychological Recovery from Enduring Mental Illness

1School of Psychology, Illawarra Institute for Mental Health, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia
2Anhanguera, Cascavel, PR, Brazil

Received 21 May 2015; Revised 23 July 2015; Accepted 30 July 2015

Academic Editor: Andrzej Pilc

Copyright © 2015 Vinicius R. Siqueira and Lindsay G. Oades. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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