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Psychiatry Journal
Volume 2017, Article ID 9827083, 4 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9827083
Research Article

Burden of Misconception in Sexual Health Care Setting: A Cross-Sectional Investigation among the Patients Attending a Psychiatric Sex Clinic of Bangladesh

Department of Psychiatry, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh

Correspondence should be addressed to S. M. Yasir Arafat; moc.liamg@26cmdtafara

Received 6 April 2017; Revised 16 May 2017; Accepted 24 May 2017; Published 27 June 2017

Academic Editor: Umberto Albert

Copyright © 2017 S. M. Yasir Arafat and Srijony Ahmed. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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