Rehabilitation Research and Practice
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Acceptance rate19%
Submission to final decision83 days
Acceptance to publication59 days
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Respiratory Function and Grip Strength in the Acute Phase of Stroke Are Associated with Stroke Severity and Disability at Hospital Discharge

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 Journal profile

Rehabilitation Research and Practice publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies in all areas of physical medicine and rehabilitation.

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Rehabilitation Research and Practice maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

Promoting Participation in Daily Activities Through Reablement: A Qualitative Study

A well-known prediction is that the growing elderly population will place a strain on our healthcare systems. At the same time, healthcare is becoming increasingly patient-centered and individualized, with the patient becoming an active participant rather than a mere object of healthcare. The need for change may be met by using a reablement service, utilizing the rehabilitation mindset through home-based services. Rehabilitation and reablement aim to provide opportunities for individuals to participate to a maximum of their potential. This study is part of a larger research project exploring different aspects of reablement in municipalities. It aims to describe how older adults engage in daily activities within the context of reablement and to explore participation in daily activities. A qualitative design was chosen, and the study is explorative in nature due to limited research on participants’ experience with reablement. Ten older adults age 70 to 94 years old were recruited and interviewed. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using systematic text condensation (STC) strategies. This study provides insights on how older adults experience participation in daily activities and important aspects for performing these activities and living independently as long as possible. Based on the older adults’ experiences, three main themes were identified when receiving reablement. First, what to achieve with reablement and feeling a sense of security to participate in daily activities. Second, how to carry out wanted activities using different skills and last, how the social network is important for enabling active living. This calls for healthcare workers to address and facilitate these in reablement. Our findings show the importance of collaborating with the social network and strengthening participation in daily activities to establish and develop existing reablement services.

Clinical Study

Objectively Measured Physical Activity and Its Association with Functional Independence, Quality of Life and In-Hospital Course of Recovery in Elderly Patients with Proximal Femur Fractures: A Prospective Cohort Study

Background. Physical activity in elderly patients is crucial for recovery from proximal femoral fractures. Considering the limited possibilities for objective measurement, we aimed to evaluate the use of an accelerometer in this population to determine activity’s association with functional independence, quality of life, and course of recovery. Methods. 52 patients undergoing operative treatment for proximal femur fractures (81.3 ± 7.5 years) were included in a prospective cohort study. 12 patients with fall but without fracture of the lower extremities (80.8 ± 9.5 years) served as control. An Axivity AX3 tracker continuously recorded signal vector magnitudes during the hospital stay. Additionally, 2 ± 1 and 8 ± 3 days (time point 1 and 2) after operation EuroQol-5D and Barthel-20 indices were evaluated. Results. Physical activity increased in all patients with time. Multiple regression analyses revealed that a high Barthel-20 before fracture, a low age, a high body mass index, high albumin, and low C-reactive protein levels were independent predictors for high physical activity at time point 1 (). Physical activity correlated significantly with EuroQol-5D and Barthel-20 at time point 1 and 2 (). Furthermore, physical activity at time point 1 predicted EuroQol-5D, physical activity, and Barthel-20 at time point 2 (). A multiple regression demonstrated equal physical activity in patients with or without a hip fracture. Conclusions. Accelerometer signals correlate with postoperative physical activity, Barthel-20 and quality of life in elderly patients. Physical activity is thereby positively influenced by a high prefall functional independence and a good nutrition status. A timely and adequate operation provided, there is no difference between patients with or without a fracture. This trial is registered with DRKS 00011934 on 10th April 2017.

Research Article

Effectiveness of Lee Silverman Voice Treatment® LOUD on Japanese-Speaking Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

Background. Lee Silverman Voice Treatment® LOUD (LSVT®) is an intensive program devised in the United States to train patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) to speak louder, at normal intensity, while keeping a good voice quality. Four weeks of LSVT® has been shown to increase vocal loudness and improve intelligibility among Japanese-speaking PD patients. However, the long-term effects of LSVT® have not been examined in these patients. Objective. This study aimed to investigate the long-term effects of LSVT® on Japanese-speaking PD patients. Methods. Twenty-one Japanese PD patients underwent a standardized course (four sessions over four consecutive days, for four weeks) of LSVT® at our hospital. Vocal loudness and intelligibility were assessed at the following three time-points: pretreatment (baseline), immediately after treatment, and at the end of the 12 month follow-up (12FU). Sound pressure levels (dB SPL) were measured during the following tasks: sustained phonation of /a/, reading a standardized text, and delivery of a monologue. Three experienced speech-language pathologists, who were blinded to patients’ identities and assessment points, assessed speech intelligibility based on recorded audio samples of each participant during the reading and monologue tasks. Results. Fourteen patients were evaluated at 12FU. Changes in dB SPL from baseline to immediately after treatment were +6.5 dB, +4.2 dB, and +2.8 dB, and those from baseline until 12FU were +4.7 dB, +3.5 dB, and +2.5 dB in sustained phonation of /a/, reading a passage, and delivery of a monologue, respectively. These changes were significant (p < 0.025) in both the baseline-to-immediately-after-treatment and baseline-to-12FU intervals. Intelligibility relative to baseline was significantly improved immediately after treatment, but not at 12FU. Conclusions. LSVT® had a long-term effect on the vocal loudness of Japanese-speaking PD patients. A short-term effect was seen in intelligibility, however, there was no significant long-term effect.

Research Article

Physiotherapists’ Experiences Using the Ekso Bionic Exoskeleton with Patients in a Neurological Rehabilitation Hospital: A Qualitative Study

Use of bionic overground exoskeletons to assist with neurological rehabilitation is becoming increasingly prevalent and has important implications for physiotherapists and their patients. Yet, there is a paucity of research about the impact of integrating this technology on physiotherapists’ work. The purpose of this study was to explore how the training and implementation of using the Ekso robotic exoskeleton with patients affects physiotherapists’ work. An exploratory qualitative study of three physiotherapists working at a neurological rehabilitation centre in Eastern Canada was conducted using one-on-one semistructured interviews in July 2017. Audio recordings were transcribed verbatim, and data was coded and analyzed using thematic analysis. Six themes emerged from the data: developing organizational capacity; ethical use of technology; benefits of the equipment; challenges of the equipment; cognitive workload; and the technological environment. The results suggest that the adoption and integration of bionic exoskeletons into rehabilitation practice is not as simple as training physiotherapists and giving them the device. More research is needed to understand the increased cognitive demands of working with patients using technologically advanced exoskeletons within a dynamic, technology-rich healthcare environment, while managing patient expectations and ethical use.

Research Article

Advancing Cardiorespiratory Physiotherapy Practice in a Developing Country: Surveying and Benchmarking

Management of noncommunicable diseases requires the adoption of multidisciplinary interventions that targets the modification of risk factors. Cardiovascular and respiratory diseases are amongst the four main killers of noncommunicable diseases. Physiotherapists specializing in cardiorespiratory physiotherapy are in a critical position in the management of health behaviors associated with noncommunicable diseases. However, the current context of health service in Jordan does not provide sufficient support and recognition for the delivery of specialized physiotherapy services. Objectives. The primary aim of this study was to describe cardiorespiratory physiotherapy service in Jordan. The secondary aims of this study were to: (i) Identify benchmarks from international contexts and guidelines for the delivery of cardiorespiratory physiotherapy service. (ii) Identify gaps and areas for development in the current delivery of cardiorespiratory physiotherapy service. Methods. This two phase study included a survey and a conceptual review with benchmarking. Following ethics approval, a cross sectional survey of physiotherapists practicing in Jordan was conducted. In phase 1, a survey was developed to describe the relevant dimensions of cardiorespiratory physiotherapy service. In phase 2 a conceptual review of the literature was performed to identify domains of service delivery and criteria required for optimal delivery of cardiorespiratory physiotherapy service. In the discussion we integrated the results of the survey within the benchmarks that emerged from the conceptual review of literature in order to identify gaps and areas for development in the current delivery of cardiorespiratory physiotherapy service. Results. Phase 1: Data emerging from the survey suggests that Physiotherapists in Jordan lack training and autonomy, preventing them from acquiring advanced roles particularly cardiorespiratory physiotherapy that requires specialised knowledge and skills. The current delivery of the service is limited to acute interventions, and is based on limited, unstructured referral from physicians depriving the patients from the service. The context of health service in Jordan does not provide sufficient recognition for physiotherapy; neither does it support the delivery of multidisciplinary interventions by appropriate regulations and policies. Phase 2: The following three domains emerged from the literature and were used for describing cardiorespiratory physiotherapy in Jordan: people, scope of practice, and context of practice. Conclusion. Advancing practice requires developing competencies relevant to cardiorespiratory physiotherapy particularly diagnosis, health promotion, and prevention. It is recommended that health authorities should develop regulations and policies that promote the recognition and integration of physiotherapists in the healthcare system, as well as facilitating the implementation of patient centred, multidisciplinary interventions.

Clinical Study

Wearing Time of Ankle-Foot Orthoses with Modular Shank Supply in Cerebral Palsy: A Descriptive Analysis in a Clinically Prospective Approach

Objective. To date there is only limited knowledge about the wearing time of orthoses. Ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) have not been studied with this research question. Additional influences of the orthotic design as well as weekdays and the weekend are also unknown. Design. Monocentric, clinically prospective intervention study. Patients. Inclusion of 10 patients with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy. Methods. Equipment of all subjects with a dynamic ankle-foot orthosis (DAFO) and modular shank supply (MSS, dynamic elastic shank adaptation or ground reaction AFO). Integration of temperature sensors for recording the wearing time for a period of 3 months. Results. The actual wearing time was below the recommendations on actually worn days as well as the average of the entire study period. In addition, the actual usage in terms of days and hours was well below the recommendations. The wearing time showed differences between weekdays and weekend. Differences between DAFO and MSS were not detectable. Conclusion. The actual usage behavior of ankle-foot orthoses differs from the recommendations of the prescriber. This applies to both DAFOs and modular use with shank supplies. Environmental factors may have a significant impact on wearing times on weekdays and the weekend.

Rehabilitation Research and Practice
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate19%
Submission to final decision83 days
Acceptance to publication59 days
CiteScore-
Impact Factor-
 Submit