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Rehabilitation Research and Practice
Volume 2012, Article ID 742106, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/742106
Review Article

Can Social Functioning in Schizophrenia Be Improved through Targeted Social Cognitive Intervention?

Division of Schizophrenia and Related Disorders, Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Health Science Center, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, MC 7797, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA

Received 2 March 2012; Accepted 9 April 2012

Academic Editor: Shaun M. Eack

Copyright © 2012 David L. Roberts and Dawn I. Velligan. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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