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Rehabilitation Research and Practice
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 963978, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/963978
Research Article

Determining the Needs, Priorities, and Desired Rehabilitation Outcomes of Young Adults Who Have Had a Stroke

1School of Health and Life Sciences, K413, Buchanan House, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow G4 0BA, UK
2Research and Evidence Division, Department for International Development, East Kilbride G75 8EA, UK

Received 25 April 2012; Accepted 21 May 2012

Academic Editor: A. C. H. Geurts

Copyright © 2012 Maggie Lawrence and Sue Kinn. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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